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A Translator and Art Historian active in Heritage Conservation. You can meet me also at : http://www.triond.com/users/Francois+Hagnere http://expertscolumn.com/user Thank you for your visit. more...

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I've published 113 articles that have been viewed 444,645 times. I've received +1,256 recommendations as an expert for my writing. I've answered 14 questions and received +17 positive votes.
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The Gothic was long to penetrate Brittany, but once the Breton craftsmen had learnt to produce gables and lacy spires, they took delight in rich ornamentation. Even in the 18th century, Breton masons were still building Gothic edifices. The towers became higher and higher as they were seized with a desperate search for empty spaces. They carved the granite and stone with a wealth of intricate decoration. Enjoy this tour of the most fabulous Cathedrals of Brittany!
Published by Francois Hagnere 62 months ago in France | +13 votes | 5 comments
Since the nineteenth-century, the Church of Paray-le-Monial has been a pilgrimage centre for the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in memory of the visions of an eighteenth-century nun, Sister Marguerite-Marie Alacoque. Inside the church, light plays on a dizzy assembly of columns and barrel vaults, bringing life to the stone; an unobtrusive twist underlines the curves like a garland. All the architectural knowledge of the Romanesque age was brought into play in the magnificent ambulatory of Paray-le-Monia...
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +14 votes | 3 comments
Souvigny is one of the finest examples of architecture and sculpture adapted by regional styles; the choir with its ambulatory and the rectangular end-chapel recall the ground-plan of Issoire in Auvergne, while the capitals ordorned with basket-work patterns reflect the proximity of Berry in the north. The church was a stopping point on the pilgrimage road to Santiago de Compostela, and has been altered several times by the Dukes of Bourbon who introduced the Gothic to the heart of France. The r...
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +18 votes | 6 comments
No church exemplifies better the architectural innovation that came in the wake of the disastrous pyres of Montségur. It is a masterpiece of the Southern Gothic; the external severity belies its joyous interior. The nave is 100 meters long, with no side-aisles, transept or ambulatory to spoil the unity of the conception and the vault is covered with blue and gold paintings of the 16th century. A magnificent dais intricately carved in white stone contrasts with the austerity of the brick walls...
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +10 votes | 4 comments
The Colonial atmosphere is at its strongest in Williamsburg, once the capital of Virginia and now possessing in that part of town known as Colonial Williamsburg, a carefully, lovingly restored evocation of 18th century life in America. To visit these towns and such plantations as Mount Vernon, Ash Lawn-Highland and Monticello - as many thousands of Washingtonians and visitors to Washington do each year - is to get caught up in the atmosphere of the 18th century world of a proud, independent peop...
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in United States & Canada | +12 votes | 6 comments
The Benedictines played a seminal role in the diffusion of architectural style here as in many other regions of France. Cupolas, bringing an unusual touch of Byzantine charm to the Aquitaine skyline, top many edifices, from Cahors to Angoulême. These are not placed on squinches, as they are at Le Puy, in Provence or at Saint-Martin-d'Ainay in Lyon, but on pendentives, springing from very wide arches carried on powerful pillars. Some people have attempted to explain this taste for cupolas.
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +11 votes | 3 comments
Wether they live in the attractive suburbs or the crowded city, most Washingtonians occasionally feel like getting away from it all. It is partly the hurly-burly and non-stop drama of life in politics, be they national or international, and partly the overwhelming humidity of the Washington Summer, that drives people out. They are lucky in that they have plenty of places to which they can escape.
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in United States & Canada | +12 votes | 4 comments
Sens and Saint-Denis, the famous necropolis of French Kings near Paris, are together the mother and father of French Gothic churches. The Bishop of Sens, Henri Sanglier, was a close friend of Abbot Suger who, no doubt, introduced him to his daring plans. If Sens Cathedral is a venerable dowager, Auxerre is a merry widow, "the merriest Gothic cathedral in Burgundy". When Abbot Guillaume de Seignelay decided to rebuild his church, he announced that his plans would give it "all the beauty of a seco...
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +11 votes | 7 comments
The heart weeps for these high points of the faith in Normandy, wrecked by the passage of time or the brutality of the human race. In the 17th century, the Congregation of Saint-Maur undertook a major programme to save many of these beautiful places; but their reconstructions often were of the kind that wiped out the original buildings. The traditional plan of Benedictine monasteries underwent modifications in the Classical Style with ornamental staircases like in a château.
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +12 votes | 4 comments
If you approach Corsica from the sea, its charm starts to work even before you set foot on its shores. The salty, seaweed tang of the open sea gives way to the offshore breeze bearing with it a unique combination of fragrant perfumes that is typically Corsican: a mixture of aloe-wood and juniper, cistus and asphodel, eucalyptus and lentisk, lavender and myrtle.
Published by Francois Hagnere 63 months ago in France | +18 votes | 6 comments
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