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My Bio

A Translator and Art Historian active in Heritage Conservation. You can meet me also at : http://www.triond.com/users/Francois+Hagnere http://expertscolumn.com/user Thank you for your visit. more...

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I've published 113 articles that have been viewed 444,645 times. I've received +1,256 recommendations as an expert for my writing. I've answered 14 questions and received +17 positive votes.
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Before it became a fashionable resort, Saint-Tropez, at the foot of the Maures uplands, was a fishing village. And earlier, it was a pirate stronghold. In the Summer, the crowds take it over, following in the well-trodden footsteps of the stars who made it so famous. All along the coast, between the Gien Peninsula and Cannes, vivid porphyry hills clothed with cork oaks and pines plunge almost sheer into the Mediterranean.
Published by Francois Hagnere 59 months ago in France | +3 votes | 0 comments
For centuries the Basques lived from pastoral farming, fishing and making the famous rope-soled sandals known as espadrilles. Since the 19th century, however, tourists have been coming to this part of France, attracted by its healthy, bracing climate, its fine beaches, picturesque fishing ports and the fascinating wealth of ancient Basque Traditions. No one knows where the Basques came from, nor where their language originated, although some Basque words have slight similarities with Japanese a...
Published by Francois Hagnere 59 months ago in France | +4 votes | 0 comments
The French Basque Country religious architecture was at its zenith at the end of the 16th century, and remained lively even in the 19th century. It has an original style, owing a large part of its appeal to the virtuosity of its carpenters. We are going to visit the Labourd, Basse-Navarre and Soule Regions.
Published by Francois Hagnere 59 months ago in France | +3 votes | 0 comments
Many influences played a part in the Romanesque Art of Brittany, particularly those from its near neighbours Poitou and Normandy. The great Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Gildas-de-Rhuys, built in yellow granite on the ambulatory plan, derives from the Loire Region; its panelled nave is lit directly by high windows. The extremely enigmatic rotunda of Lanleff still baffles archaelogists who try to see in its plan some Druidic temple to the Sun.
Published by Francois Hagnere 61 months ago in France | +17 votes | 3 comments
Certain regions of France have never been the site of ostentatious courts, nor of flourishing industries, they have had no famous schools, nor well-known artists, nor luxurious palaces nor wealthy towns. Their modest rustic charm entrances without dazzling, and their crudely hewn, bare stone renders them inseparable from the village whose toil they sanctify, and from the countryside with which they are linked by many secrets ties.
Published by Francois Hagnere 61 months ago in France | +11 votes | 1 comments
Like all Breton calvaries, Tronoën is an enigmatic piece of work. With their suggestions of savagery, their striking realism, their depiction of the closeness of death, the religious statuary of the 15th and 16th centuries in Brittany achieved a haunting power which had rarely been matched and at the same time expressed the spirit of the people. This unique blend of toughness and mysticism and a living background of Celtic traditions can still be found near the Pointe du Raz.
Published by Francois Hagnere 61 months ago in France | +13 votes | 4 comments
When people talk about the Châteaux on the Loire, they usually refer to the châteaux along the tributaries of the river as well as those on the banks of the Loire itself. Some even prefer the châteaux on the tributaries to those of the parent river. Chenonceau with its magnificent gallery on the Cher River has always been a ladies' château. No less than six have been involved in its history, among them the fascinating Diane de Poitiers, mistress of Henri II.
Published by Francois Hagnere 61 months ago in France | +9 votes | 2 comments
The builders of Saint-Sernin wanted to rival the Benedictines of Cluny when they erected the vast basilica of Toulouse. All the resources available to a pilgrimage church were brought into play: ambulatory with radiating chapels, transepts with small apses, and above the crossing, a huge five-storey tower. In the Gothic period, an octagonal spire completed it. There is no doubt that with Conques, it represented the apotheosis of this kind of pilgrimage basilica, barely inferior to Compostela its...
Published by Francois Hagnere 62 months ago in France | +16 votes | 8 comments
The rock was converted to Christianity by Saint-Auber, bishop of Avranches, acting on the orders - so tradition has it - of Saint-Michael the Archangel. But profoundly Christian that it is, this gem of western architecture retains its links with an earlier magical tradition. In the Summer, its mystical beauty is spoilt by the teeming crowds and souvenir shops. But during the Winter, the Mont-Saint-Michel comes back into its own when solitude descends, the cold wind blows and the waves hammer aga...
Published by Francois Hagnere 62 months ago in France | +11 votes | 2 comments
From Honfleur and its calm harbour on the "Côte de Grâce" to Deauville on the "Côte Fleurie" where so many personalities have strolled at some time or the other on the famous "planches" to Omaha Beach and the historic sites of 1944 Allied landings, you will discover the various faces of Normandy coastline. At Coutances, you will admire a majestic Gothic cathedral that seems to defy the laws of gravity. You will also have a glimpse of the "Norman Switzerland" down to the marvellous Mont-...
Published by Francois Hagnere 62 months ago in France | +9 votes | 5 comments
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